Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Fate of the total score: Dimensionality of the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-46 (CMNI-46).

The Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory-46 (CMNI-46) measures conformity to hegemonic masculine gender role norms. Research offers conflicting conclusions regarding the CMNI-46’s dimensionality, with varying degrees of support for models that consi…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: The <em>Psychology of Men and Masculinities</em>: Using citation network analysis to understand research domains, collaborations, and grant competitiveness.

Citation network analysis is a powerful tool to understand a research area. Citation networks differ from traditional content analyses in that, instead of coding articles based on declared features, citation network analysis groups articles into cluste…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Influence of intimate terrorism, situational couple violence, and mutual violent control on male victims.

The goal of the current study is to test—among samples of men—some previous findings relative to Johnson’s (2008) typology of partner violence (PV). Among samples of exclusively women, Johnson found that the frequency and severity of PV—and victims’ me…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: A content analysis of research on masculinity ideologies using all forms of the Male Role Norms Inventory (MRNI).

Since its development in the late 1980s, the Male Role Norms Inventory (MRNI) and related forms have been used in 91 studies to examine masculinity ideologies through male role norms in the United States and other countries with over 30,000 participant…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Toward diversifying research participants: Measurement invariance of the Male Role Norms Inventory–Short Form (MRNI-SF) across recruitment method.

To facilitate recruitment of more diverse samples, the measurement invariance of the Male Role Norms Inventory–Short Form (MRNI-SF) across participant recruitment method (college/university vs. Internet) was assessed by conducting a series of multigrou…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Recommendations for male-friendly individual counseling with men: A qualitative systematic literature review for the period 1995–2016.

Over the past few decades, there have been calls to customize therapy for men. Researchers have increasingly become aware of the impact of masculinity on men and their psychological health, their willingness to seek help, and their experience of therap…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Masculine discrepancy stress and psychosocial maladjustment: Implications for behavioral and mental health of adolescent boys.

Gender role discrepancy (GRD), or nonconformity to socially prescribed gender roles, has been linked to a multitude of adverse mental and behavioral health outcomes. Masculine discrepancy stress (MDS), stress about being perceived not to conform to one…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Dimensionality, reliability, and validity of the Gender-Role Conflict Scale–Short Form (GRCS-SF).

The Gender Role Conflict Scale–Short Form (GRCS-SF) was derived from the widely used Gender Role Conflict Scale and is thought to measure men’s personal and relational distress from rigid adherence to restrictive masculinities. Extant research suggests…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: To be (healthy) or not to be: Moderated mediation of the relationships between masculine norms, future orientation, family income, and college men’s healthful behaviors.

Conformity to masculine norms has been found to be associated negatively with men’s engagement in healthful behaviors. However, some men still engage in healthful behaviors despite the potential violation of masculine norms. Future orientation, which i…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Exploring sexual consent and hostile masculine norms using the theory of planned behavior.

Drawing on sexual violence prevention research and grounded in the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991), the current study examines the role of masculine norms in explaining men’s intentions to engage in consensual sexual behaviors. Undergraduate men (N = 144) completed surveys to report their conformity to/rejection of hostile masculine norms (i.e., acceptance of violence, power over women, and playboy), their attitudes toward asking for consent, their sense of perceived control over asking for consent, their intentions to ask for consent, and their engagement in indirect consent behaviors (i.e., use nonverbal cues and body language to determine consent). A path analysis revealed that men who endorsed hostile masculine norms reported a greater lack of control over asking for consent (β = .20, p

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