Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Factors associated with Chinese American and White cancer survivors’ physical and psychological functioning.

Objective: To examine whether health-related stressors and resources are associated with physical function, depression, and anxiety in Chinese American and White breast cancer survivors. Method: During 2011–2013, this cross-sectional study enrolled Chinese American and White women from California cancer registries diagnosed with Stage 0–III breast cancer between 2006 and 2012. Survivors completed a telephone survey assessing health-related factors including comorbidity, treatment-related symptoms, medical communication, perceived threat, use of coping, and social support resources. Outcomes were assessed using the Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) short forms. Chinese were classified as low- or high-acculturated based on English proficiency, years in the United States, and interview language. Analyses were conducted using Tobit regression models. Results: Low-acculturated Chinese (n = 136) had worse physical functioning than Whites (n = 216), controlling for demographics, cancer stage, and time since diagnosis (β = −3.33, p = .01). This disparity was attenuated after adjusting for comorbidity and symptoms (β = −1.63, p = .18). Perceived threat, disengagement coping, and lack of social support were associated with poorer psychological outcomes, regardless of ethnicity. Although low-acculturated Chinese had lower scores on all health-related factors than Whites, the former reported significantly lower level of depression (β = −3.23) and anxiety (β = −5.8) after adjusting for covariates (both p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Randomized controlled trial of a facilitated online positive emotion regulation intervention for dementia caregivers.

Objective: To test the effects of Life Enhancing Activities for Family Caregivers (LEAF), a 6-week positive emotion regulation intervention, on outcomes of positive emotion, depression, anxiety, and physical health as measured by the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®). Method: A randomized controlled trial (N = 170) comparing LEAF (N = 86) to an emotion reporting/waitlist condition (N = 84) in dementia caregivers. LEAF was individually delivered online by trained facilitators. Participants in the control condition completed daily online emotion reports and then crossed over into the intervention condition after 6 weeks. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01825681) and funded by R01NR014435. Results: Analyses of difference in change from baseline to 6 weeks demonstrated significantly greater decreases in PROMIS® depression (d = −.25; p = .02) and Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders (NeuroQOL) anxiety (d = −.33; p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: PROMIS®-assessed sleep problems and physical health symptoms in adult psychiatric inpatients.

Objective: The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between sleep problems and somatic symptoms in a sample of adult psychiatric inpatients and evaluate the utility of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) Sleep Disturbance Measure as a predictor of physical health symptom severity within this population. Method: Ninety-five adults were assessed following admission to an inpatient psychiatric hospital. Demographic and medical information were extracted via chart review. Participants completed the PROMIS® Sleep Disturbance Measure–Short Form, the PROMIS® Depression Measure–Short Form, the DSM–5 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure (CCSM), and the Patient Health Questionnaire–Physical Symptoms (PHQ-15). A hierarchical linear regression was conducted predicting severity of physical symptoms from PROMIS® Sleep scores, while controlling for gender, depression scores, number of medications, number of psychiatric diagnoses, and whether the participant was undergoing detoxification. Results: Data showed that 50% of participants reported medium/high levels of physical health symptoms, and 41% reported moderate/severe levels of sleep disturbance. A positive screen on the CCSM Somatic Symptoms domain was a significant predictor of more self-reported physical health symptoms (β = 0.278, p = .005, 95% CI [1.24, 6.61]). When PROMIS® Sleep scores were included, the model accounted for significantly more variability in physical health symptom scores (ΔR2 = 0.085, F = 9.150, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: A preliminary investigation of the psychometric properties of PROMIS® scales in emerging adults with sickle cell disease.

Objective: To report preliminary psychometric properties of PROMIS® assessments among emerging adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). Method: Forty-five emerging adults with SCD ages 18–24 (M = 20.81, SD = 1.73) completed PROMIS® Pain Interference and Fatigue short forms and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL). Chart review was used to obtain information regarding SCD complications and health care utilization in the 3 years prior to study enrollment. Multivariate path analysis was used to compare PROMIS® scores by disease severity and use of disease-modifying therapies. Cronbach’s alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency, and Pearson correlations assessed convergent validity between PROMIS® measures and the PedsQL. Results: Internal consistency was excellent for PROMIS® Pain Interference (α = .95) and good for PROMIS® Fatigue (α = .85). Associations between PROMIS® measures and PedsQL subscales were in the expected direction and large in magnitude (all ps

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Use of the PROMIS® Depression scale and the Beck Depression Inventory in patients with heart failure.

Objective: This study evaluated agreement between the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®) Depression scale and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) in patients with heart failure and comorbid major depression. Method: The BDI-II and the computerized adaptive test version of the PROMIS® Depression scale were administered at baseline to 158 participants in a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavior therapy for major depression in patients with heart failure. A crosswalk table (Choi, Schalet, Cook, & Cella, 2014) was used to transform the PROMIS® scores into “linked” BDI-II equivalent scores. Bland-Altman plots, histograms, and scatterplots were used to visualize the agreement between these scores at baseline and 6 months, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated for each occasion to quantify the agreement. Treatment effects and change scores were also examined. Results: The measures agreed moderately at baseline (ICC = 0.52, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Construct validity of PROMIS® Cognitive Function in cancer patients and noncancer controls.

Objective: The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Cognitive Function-Concerns® (PROMIS®-CF-Concerns) assesses self-reported cognitive complaints. Construct validity data for the CF-Concerns are few. To add to the literature, an analysis of criterion validity for cognitive complaints (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer—Cognitive Functioning subscale [EORTC-CF]) and cognitive performance (neuropsychological tests of memory [NIH Toolbox Auditory Verbal Learning Test] and verbal fluency [Controlled Oral Word Association Test]) and discriminant validity (self-reports of negative emotions of anxiety, depression, negative mood) are provided. A two-group comparison design was used. Method: Forty-four patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and 44 age- and gender-matched noncancer controls completed self-report measures and neuropsychological tests. Spearman’s rank correlations (rs) and independent-samples t tests were used. Results: Regarding criterion validity, PROMIS®-CF-Concerns significantly correlated with the EORTC-CF (rs = 0.77, p

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