Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Training pediatric residents in behavioral health collaboration: Roles, evaluation, and advocacy for pediatric psychologists.

Objective: This commentary describes the current state of pediatric resident training in behavioral health and highlights specific pediatric residency training modalities that may be facilitated or enhanced by involvement of pediatric psychologists. Me…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Assessment of functional outcomes of an interdisciplinary inpatient pediatric pain rehabilitation program.

Objective: The aim of the current study was to replicate and extend the program outcome analysis previously reported by Maynard, Amari, Wieczorek, Christensen, and Slifer (2010) by evaluating and describing the effectiveness of the same inpatient inter…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Effectiveness of family-based treatment for pediatric eating disorders in a tertiary care setting.

Objective: A retrospective chart review was conducted to investigate outcomes in children and adolescents who entered family-based treatment (FBT) in a tertiary eating disorders treatment setting that offers treatment across the continuum of care (i.e….

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: The integrated prevention model of pain–Chronic pain prevention in the primary care setting.

Objective: Chronic pain is a significant problem that affects a large percentage of children around the world (King et al., 2011). It is widely accepted that pediatric chronic pain can lead to functional impairment, including decreased school attendanc…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Anxiety among adolescents with asthma: Relationships with asthma control and sleep quality.

Objective: Adolescents with asthma are at increased risk for poor sleep quality, anxiety, and worse asthma control. Given associations between sleep and anxiety among youth and between asthma control and anxiety in the adult literature, this cross-sect…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Impact of pediatrician invitation on enrollment in behavioral parent training.

Given that parent training in behavior therapy is recommended as a first-line treatment for young children with challenging behaviors, mechanisms to increase parent engagement are needed. A between-groups intervention study was conducted in a primary care setting with 482 families of children with challenging behaviors. Families received 1 of 2 mailings. The first included a flyer advertising a behavioral parent training (BPT) program, whereas the second included both the flyer and a personal invitation from the pediatrician. Twenty-three families enrolled in the BPT program. Of these, 20 had received both the flyer and invitation, whereas only 3 who had received only the flyer enrolled, a significant difference, χ (1) = 5.83, p

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Adolescents with suspected intentional overdose: Ethical considerations in determining liver transplant candidacy.

As the suicide rate for early adolescents has doubled in the past decade, pediatric liver transplant centers may more frequently encounter patients who present with acute liver failure secondary to an intentional ingestion of substances. The purpose of…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Implementing screening with the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT) in clinical oncology practice.

Implementing evidence-based approaches to assessment and screening in pediatric psychology practice is important to bridge gaps in clinical care. Identifying specific implementation strategies that result in successful uptake of evidence-based approach…

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Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Pilot study to examine the clinical utility of biofeedback in solid organ transplant.

Biofeedback-assisted relaxation training (BART) is a useful therapeutic tool for treating pain and anxiety, 2 common issues for patients waiting for and recovering from transplant. Most applications occur in outpatient settings and current research exploring this intervention with transplant patients is limited. The impact of BART on patient-reported mood and pain during hospitalizations is explored. Forty patients referred to transplant psychology for assistance in managing pain and/or anxiety during medical admissions participated in BART. Patients ranged in age from 9 to 23 years (M = 15.5, SD = 3.7) and completed an average of 2.1 sessions per admission (range: 1–6). BART was utilized by 20 patients prior to transplant, 24 patients posttransplant, and 4 patients both before and after transplant. Mood improvements were reported after BART, regardless of pain level (pre: M = 6.05, SD = 2.28, post: M = 7.45, SD = 1.92, p

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