Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Peer victimization and the perpetual foreigner stereotype on Sikh American adolescents’ mental health outcomes: The moderating effects of coping and behavioral enculturation.

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The current study examined whether different coping strategies and levels of behavioral enculturation (defined as engagement in linguistic, cultural, and religious practices) moderate the relationship between peer victimization, the perpetual foreigner stereotype, and Sikh American adolescents' mental health (e.g., self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and anxiety symptoms). The sample consisted of 202 Sikh American adolescents from 75 cities in California (54% male, Mage = 14.19 years, SD = 1.86). Results indicate that both peer victimization and the perpetual foreigner stereotype are significantly related to lower self-esteem and more depressive and anxiety symptoms. Problem-focused coping relates to higher self-esteem, whereas avoidant coping is associated with lower self-esteem. Behavioral enculturation is linked to fewer depressive symptoms. In addition, high avoidant coping worsens the relationship between peer victimization and anxiety symptoms and between the perpetual foreigner stereotype and anxiety symptoms. Low behavioral enculturation also exacerbates the relationship between the perpetual foreigner stereotype and depressive symptoms. Findings highlight the importance of behavioral enculturation and appropriate coping strategies in the context of peer victimization, the perpetual foreigner stereotype, and Sikh American adolescents' mental health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved)