Article Correctness Is Author's Responsibility: Contributions of the integrative model for the study of developmental competencies in minority children: What have we learned about adaptive culture?

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The integrative model for the study of developmental competencies in minority children (García Coll et al., 1996) is considered by many to have signaled a landmark shift in conceptualizing the normative development of minority children. Since its publication, the model has been widely used in child development scholarship to challenge deficit perspectives of ethnic-racial minority children and families, which were—and arguably still are—pervasive. In this article, we provide a systematic qualitative review of the research pertaining to what García Coll and colleagues (1996) termed adaptive culture, which refers to "a social system defined by sets of goals, values, and attitudes that differs from the dominant culture” (p. 1896), and which on its own has been discussed in 93 studies. We conclude with a critical discussion of areas of inquiry informed by the integrative model and recommendations for future directions in theory and empirical work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved)